The peace of God at Christmas . . . and all year

I could make a metaphor about the pea-brained bird that kept banging at the window for an hour trying to get in to a place that he would have found out too late he didn’t want to be. You know where it would have gone: I would have applied it to our frenetic activity at Christmastime.

But I’ll refrain.

How can we as believers have peace with God—knowing that His wrath isn’t directed at us—but not have the peace of God, still feeling an ongoing inner turmoil? (As in, “Beck, why does your jaw keep working in and out like that?” That was my sister talking. It was twenty years ago, but I still remember it well.)

But really shouldn’t peace with God and the peace of God go hand in hand? If I don’t get that, it’s because there’s something I don’t understand . . . or something I don’t remember.

It is the God of peace who resurrected our great Savior (the one who became the great Shepherd of the sheep through the blood of the everlasting covenant), who can make you perfectly fitted in every good way to accomplish His great will in your very own life, which will actually bring joy to the heart of God. (That’s a sort-of paraphrase of Hebrews 13:20-21.)

The peace of the New Covenant in our great Savior is not just judicial, not just a statement on paper determining our destination, but is very practical in daily life, producing a joyful calmness of spirit based in understanding and remembering who He is to us. The foundation of God’s peace, the resurrection, the Shepherd, the blood, the Covenant, will result in the great joy of bringing joy to the heart of God.

Oh, you who are longing to love Him more, you who want to be free of your burdens of anxiety and distractedness and a heart that is drawn away, oh, you who want to be freed from the chains of your sin, understand that you are complete in Christ, and turn your eyes to Him again and again and again. Seek to be reminded, and cry out for understanding.

The peace that we long for at Christmastime can fill us all year long.

I welcome your thoughts