Godliness through Discipline by Jay Adams: a response

The response that I’ve posted here on Amazon is really more of a commentary on Jay Adams’ “nouthetic counseling” perspective on sanctification. Does Godliness really come through development of habits, as Jay Adams has been teaching since the early 1970s? When you understand the New Testament (and the Old in the light of the New), that’s not at all the picture that you see.

Why is this important? It’s about the victory that Jesus promised being more than theoretical. This carries over into all that we do, every good work we undertake, every relationship  we have. It means the difference between joy and burdens in living the Christ life.

Update: The full critique of this book that presents Jay Adam’s nouthetic counseling program is now posted on BJUGrace. You can read Part One here.

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Dick Ellis
Dick Ellis
7 years ago

Richard Foster’s book on the Disciplines is a similiar book as Jay Adam’s. Richard Foster appears to be a follower of the “contemplative spirituality” movement. It’s a mixture of Christian truth, Catholic traditions and TM.

Anonymous
Anonymous
7 years ago

Thank you so much for posting this! I have seen and experienced this type of counseling and recognize how empty and hopeless it is. I know so many who have been really hurt by this counseling. It almost destroyed me.

Francine De Von, Canada
Francine De Von, Canada
3 years ago

oh, yes, this counseling is indeed dangerous. It now parades under “ACBC” and is even more perverse than previously. Let’s pray the name change under Heath Lambert is hopefully going to lead to the end of this anti-biblical thing in which its counselors are “certified.” It is simply unbelievable, but one should consider its theological foundations.

The sooner this nonsense stops, the better. It is destructive, patriarchal, and dare I say it: obsessed with all things sexually abnormal.