That time I tried to be transparent in a small group . . .

About 15 years ago I joined a certain group because everyone else was doing it and it seemed like the thing to do in order to be a better Christian, which of course I wanted very much.

The group followed a format that I found out later was typical, but it was all new to me at that time: We listened together to the respected speaker for the first hour, and then split up into small groups for the second hour.

This is where we would be transparent.

The two leaders, who were of course strangers, asked us all to promise not to speak to anyone else about what we would hear from others in that group where we, about 5 or 6 strangers, would open up to each other about our dark secrets. We all made that promise. (Except I don’t know if the leaders did or not.)

And we were encouraged to be transparent.

So I decided to try. I really did.

At that time, for several months I had been going through a period of darkness that I later wrote about here. When my turn came, maybe the 2nd or 3rd week, I started talking about it.

“I’ve been going through a really hard time, like a spiritual battle, I guess. . . . I just can’t get victory, feels like I’m being pulled down, dark thoughts all the time. I dunno, maybe it’s demonic . . . I keep crying out to God, but it’s so dark, like I can’t see my hand in front of my face . . .”

Then one of the group leaders interrupted me with a strong rebuke.

“Where is the Word of God in all this? You keep talking about yourself, just I, I, I—where is the Word of God?”

Now, others have told me that all my feelings show on my face. (I’ve tried to get better at this, but you still wouldn’t want to choose me to be your international spy.) So I’m guessing that my face turned either red or white and contorted with the utter confusion I felt.

If there hadn’t been so much internal confusion, I might have put up a robust argument. “Hey, you said we were supposed to be transparent. Isn’t this what that means?”

But as it was, I became very quiet and meek. I began to fumble through my purse, pulling out these cards, or others like them.

“Well,” my response came quietly, almost apologetically. “These are the cards I carry with me everywhere. When I’m driving I hold them up at the steering wheel and read them out loud. They’re all handwritten, so I can pray them while I write them.”

It was then the leader’s turn to be confused. And to apologize, which she did.

But that shut me up, and I decided it wasn’t safe to be transparent in that group. Or maybe not any group.

(But as a side note, others have actually said that I’m transparent.)

So, two observations in 2020 about this story from so long ago.

First, I know that I desperately wanted God. I wanted God to rescue me. I wanted to see and know His glory. And I was sure God’s Word would be a major player in all this.

He came. He did. I did. And it was. That terrible time of darkness gave rise, eventually, to a time of great joy, even glory, which eventually gave birth to this blog.

And second, transparency is a fake Christian virtue. Fake in the sense that transparency is not actually virtuous (and lack of it is not a sin), and it isn’t mentioned in the Bible at all. I’ve talked about this before (most notably here, here, and here), but as my grandmother used to say, it bears repeating.

If you want to keep your story to yourself and hash it out with God alone, there’s nothing in the Bible that says you can’t or shouldn’t do so (unless it involves repenting of your sins against someone else)—that’s what I ultimately did.

If you want to talk to someone about it or seek help with it, pray to God to send you someone faithful and trustworthy you can confide in, who instead of rebuking you for talking about yourself (as the psalmist certainly did), will help you find rescue in Jesus Christ.

But don’t let the Christian world force you into the “everyone else is doing it” fake virtue of transparency. Look for transformation by Jesus Christ, live in integrity, and be free.

Happy New Year. And may 2020 be a year when Jesus Christ reigns supreme in the lives of His people . . . whether they’re transparent or not.

 

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Jeff Sylvlester
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Jeff Sylvlester

Also, while vulnerability/transparency *can *be a good thing, you don’t just toss it out there because you are in a group and everyone is automatically safe. That kind of trust must be vetted and earned.

Our last small group, my wife and I were told to share examples of difficult things in our relationship that made us stronger (which, btw, I don’t think is a great idea to begin with). We both shared examples from our previous marriages (because honestly, we feel like our marriage is easy-mode compared to what came before) and we got a call from the leaders afterward saying not to talk about our previous marriages because it was making people uncomfortable.

Yeah, be honest unless it’s not something they want to hear . . .

Joe Pote
Guest

Because making sure people are comfortable is the most important part of Christian living, right? SMH

Years ago, when I was in abusive marriage, I was honestly sharing my struggles with someone I considered a friend and prayer partner. He told me he wasn’t really comfortable hearing about it. I asked, “If you’re uncomfortable hearing about it, how do you think I’ve felt living with it all these years?”

Laura Grace
Guest

Good point! I wish I’d thought of that one when I was in a pickle! truly!

Rachel
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Rachel

“Confidence in an unfaithful man in time of trouble is like a broken tooth and a foot out of joint….A righteous man falling down before the wicked is as a troubled fountain and a corrupt spring.” Proverbs 25:19, 26

I think it’s so important to have relationships with people you can trust, and with them, you can share your failings and your struggles, but you NEED to know you can trust them. And God certainly knows our pain. We have to realize that in church, the wheat is not separated from the tares. And so our faith shouldn’t be put in a group of people just because they call themselves Christian and attend the same church or Bible study that we do.

Rachel
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Rachel

Even family can betray your trust. It’s important to know the heart of the one you share your heart with … can you trust it or not. If the answer is no or you don’t know, don’t share!

Also, even with fellow believers, there is faulty judgment. People who fail to understand the full story of someone’s experience yet are quick to cast judgment. Scripture is not meant to be used to guilt one another into holy living… it is meant to free us to it. It’s much easier to do that than to take the time to know someone’s heart and being willing to feel the pain. I think the Good Samaritan is a good example of what happens spiritually when we judge one another unrighteously. Righteous judgment doesn’t cause us to look down on each other. It recognizes our frailty and suffering and comes alongside and helps us understand our need for God and His love for us.

Julie Kong
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Julie Kong

Amen

Gail
Guest

I think without transparency there is a lack of meaningful and deeper connection. But I’ve learned not to be too open with those who are not open with me.

Relationships that are imbalanced or lopsided end up very unhealthy.

If it’s leaders simply mining for info while they keep all their stuff private there is a problem.

Safety and trust are required for authentic and transparent relationships. It cannot be demanded or forced.

It is terrible that you went through this experience and I would understand the need for extreme caution going forward.

But I think this group showcased the opposite of what sharing in a healthy environment with trusted people can do that you just don’t get with you & God alone: removing shame.

When we are fearful of how people will respond to our struggles shame builds.

We are made to be “one body with many parts” (1 Cor.12:12) where one part can’t say to the other “I have no need of thee” (1 Cor.12:21) where “if one member suffers we all suffer” (1 Cor.12:26)
where we are told to “carry each other’s burdens and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.” (Gal.6:2)

Susan
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Susan

Gail – Thank you for fleshing out your comments further, and I concur with your assessments of the younger and older generations in general. Integrity is huge, and colors both sides of the equation. In Rebecca Davis’ post, however, the eager-beaver group leader violated the first line of integrity for small groups by jumping in with her “questions” of redirecting to the Word of God. My first thought was “Let the woman finish!” instead of assuming there was a problem to solve and an end goal in sight. The jump to judgment/pointing to scripture was premature for a healthy small group situation. Healthy leadership goes a long way to help a small group develop healthy trust and transparency. It is an art and an endeavor, not an event.

Lisa
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Lisa

“Vulnerable transparency” are codewords for “data mining” to a skilled abuser.

Quietrunner
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Quietrunner

Sometimes its really hard to know “who the bad guys are”.

Lisa
Guest
Lisa

It is easy in this data-driven age to confuse “knowing everything about someone” with “knowing someone.” With the online dating filter mentality, we can “feel we really have a lot in common,” but it takes time to develop intimacy, to know someone.

Julie Kong
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Julie Kong

Thank you so very much- especially for your earlier post you linked, on your earlier period of darkness. I have felt like I was going crazy, and that post makes me feel not so alone.

After reading it I googled “horror of great darkness” and found this incredible sermon by an early 19th c pastor Andrew Lee. I am profoundly comforted by hearing his recounting of so many of the saints’ “horror of great darkness.” I think there are additional things to be said, such as our need for the body of Christ to walk alongside us at such times, to help us carry our burden, to embody Jesus to each other.

So thank you for helping me.

https://biblehub.com/library/lee/sermons_on_various_important_subjects/sermon_v_abrams_horror_of.htm

Kristen
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Kristen

Not a small group story, but a violation of vulnerable transparency … went to a youth pastor (not at my church, at a college group) to ask some questions that were bothering me. I thought the whole thing was in confidence. He answered my questions, though I don’t think he thought he was answering what he thought he was answering. (Some slight difference between what I asked and what he answered, but it was close enough to give the clarity and comfort I needed greatly.) However, AFTER that … turned out it wasn’t private after all … not only did he tell his wife (who brought it up in small group Bible study!!!!!!) but he used that information incorrectly to speak to my sister’s boyfriend, to ‘warn him off’ because ‘our family might not really be Christian enough for him’. (He was the ministry’s golden boy at the time and meant for Great Things, though we didn’t know that … he was just a nice guy dating my younger sister.) I didn’t know about that till my sister comes home one day, shrieking and asking what on earth did I say to Pastor X. It was horrid, and left me very scarred, and very careful what I ask in private. It still baffles me that he gave a good answer but still managed to twist it for evil because he completely missed the CONTEXT of the question. Fortunately, we are all many years out from that … sister and guy are happily married, I am happily married, we all have our issues but work through them … and I avoid small groups like the plague (though it took a few more lessons to let that one sink in). Ironically, I now teach youth Sunday School as an interim position, and I kick butt if anyone gives anyone a hard time for what they think or how they feel … and make sure they know that God’s grip on us is tighter than that. 😀 They need to know that.

Julie Kong
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Julie Kong

I totally get the necessity of building trust, being appropriately and wisely cautious in our openness. I’m on the same page with what you’re saying here.

But I’m also thinking of Paul’s loving entreaty to the Corinthians, saints so dear to him: “Open wide your hearts, as I have opened mine to you.” He loved them and was “transparent” even when they had treated him poorly.

Just another side of the coin to hold in one hand with this post. We so need to call out for wisdom.

SANDRA LOVELACE
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SANDRA LOVELACE

Thanks for that permission. I’ve discovered the same issues in similar situations. Now to discern the times when spiritual connection needs a boost with another human, and when that intimacy would be damaged by the same.

Cindy Burrell
Guest

This is so good – such an important eye-opener to the risks of being “transparent” in a Christian setting. The same may also be true in the offices of some pastors and Christian counselors, who may be similarly quick to point out all of the ways we are failing as believers.

When we don’t feel accepted, seen or heard in such a setting, it’s important to give ourselves permission to walk away.

I’ll be sharing this. It’s too good to keep to myself!

Tim Yarbrough
Guest
Tim Yarbrough

Mrs. Davis, I became convinced quite some time ago that the destructive potential with the whole “accountable to another brother” movement, though perhaps with good intentions, sought to place a mere human in the place of the Holy Spirit. It can and very often does become, though not necessarily so, a methodology that promotes and encourages immaturity in believers because God does genuinely see everything and knows all – not just our own perceptions of what we may claim as reality or what others may assert for the same. The ultimate goal for the believer is to live under the direct care, control, and government of the Holy Spirit as He guides us through the instructions and application of God’s Word. It was David who cried out “search me oh God and know my heart” – because he knew God was the only one he could trust with such a task.
While there is nothing inherently sinful in confessing our sins one to another, that needs to be within the context of trusted friendships.

Wendy Mae Gillies
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Wendy Mae Gillies

Thank you for that Tim Yarbrough. We need to ultimately listen to the Holy Spirit more than anyone else and hold ourselves accountable to Him. And we must trust ourselves to be able to hear His voice too. Direct communication with Him is the best! Certainly church leaders and Christian mentors can be wrong sometimes. Good grief, even my mom is wrong once in a blue moon!

TS00
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TS00

I think it is extremely unwise to be ‘transparent’, as in, share deep, dark secrets in a group. Particularly a group of strangers. No way. And, sadly, many have reported that these sorts of sharings have been used by church leaders to manipulate and threaten church members who may ask too many questions, etc. Share what you feel comfortable with whom you feel comfortable, and don’t let peer pressure force you to go beyond what feels comfortable.

I love the cards. I have an old spiral notebook in which I copied down some of my favorite, encouraging verses. I have read them silently and aloud many a time over the last thirty years. They went missing after a move, and I was so sad. I rejoiced when they finally turned up. I am having to recopy them, as I have pretty much worn out the pages. 😉

Lisa Mol
Guest
Lisa Mol

Thank you for this excellent (and honest) article. I have a dear Christian friend who gives Nothing but trite bible answers to everything. She thinks it is a sin to worry or be upset about things bc the bible says not to. She has destroyed a small group and a Mops group bc she got so upset at people for fretting. This makes her a very unsafe person to be real with.

Amy
Guest
Amy

My stomach churned when I read your post bcs BTDT…ugh! Have learned the hard way (several times) that churches and transparency are not always a safe combination. One of my close friends gave me the best piece of advice regarding this whole issue a couple years ago: “We are to be authentic with all, vulnerable with a few and totally transparent with the One.”

Jane
Guest
Jane

Hi Rebecca, a very similar thing happened to me a few years ago, and it hurt like crazy! I thought I was in a “safe place,” among Christian friends…. I was transparent and got scolded! “You must forgive!” I was told after explaining how someone very close to me had betrayed my trust and broken my heart. Sure, she was right, but boy did I feel invalidated. She later apologized (and I forgave her), but I never trusted her again with my heart!

Laura Grace
Guest

Thank you! Laura Grace, Author, Grace to the Rescue and many more! I shared this on my FB today. and I don’t often do this! LOL

Lisa Vos
Guest
Lisa Vos

Thank you. Not to air any dirty laundry here, but DH would tell ANYONE ANYTHING in the name of transparency. The whole church body knew our business. I am not afraid to be honest-even raw-about my pain with a few friends I trust. Every other time, I’m just trying to be sincere but discreet and discerning. I learned in my journey that folks who rebuke when you spill your guts about something just really aren’t strong enough to bear that burden with you, and need to be seen as weak in conscience and faith. It makes them very uncomfortable. So out of love for that weaker brother/sister, I am very careful to save the hard things to share with a strong, close friend.

NGal
Guest
NGal

Oh yes, all that transparency stuff.. reveal your inner secrets to a group of strangers, in order to be spiritual and become a rue disciple.. It is so twisted, but unless you have come out of systems which are in that mentality, it is hard to recognize as harmful. How about bringing back ‘safety’ instead of (forced) ‘transparency’?