Writing about triumph like Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens loved England. Because of this love, he felt a deep sense of urgency to help his homeland change in important ways. He wanted people to care about the poor, to care about orphans, and to arise from their complacency.

While his contemporary George Mueller worked for change by trusting God and starting an orphanage, Charles Dickens worked for change by writing books. Continue reading “Writing about triumph like Charles Dickens”

Lessons from Teaching English as a Second Language

Teaching English as a Second Language has taught me something about English: There are loads of rules. People from other countries who just have to learn the rules and then all the rules about the rules (meta-rules?) can feel utterly overwhelmed with the complexity of the language we speak naturally. They can even become resentful. They could wish that English were their first language, but of course that cannot be.

But if you grew up in a home where English is spoken all the time, and spoken correctly, then it will seem natural, and the rules will come easily. In fact, you’ll be able to intuit rules you’ve never even heard. “Oh yes, I see. I thought so.” Continue reading “Lessons from Teaching English as a Second Language”

A Tribute to Dr. John Dreisbach, 1922-2009

Dr. John Dreisbach was one of the “old school” missionaries, who spent his life serving as a career missionary doctor and evangelist in various places around the world. When he died, I was working on a children’s book about his adventures in western Africa. Perhaps the book will never be finished, but as a tribute, I am posting here the first chapter.

CHAPTER 1
The Mantle

“Don’t know what to say, Mrs. Dreisbach. Sure am sorry.” Mr. Johnson stood at the kitchen table with his hat in his hand. “Don’t seem like enough to say that.” Continue reading “A Tribute to Dr. John Dreisbach, 1922-2009”

reading Tozer’s The Pursuit of God

This summer I’ve been studying Tozer’s The Pursuit of God with my two daughters, ages 22 and 16. Every Thursday we go someplace, a restaurant or a park, and talk about the next chapter.

And I’m reminded of what this book meant to me when I read it for the first time, only a few years ago.

All those years as a Christian, I knew about this book. But as much as I was seeking the Lord and trying to point other people to Him, for some reason I was never drawn to The Pursuit of God. It was one summer, after crying out with Moses for the Lord to show me His glory, that I was re-introduced to Tozer.

But now, my heart was ready, because of some intense work the Lord had been doing in my soul. I call it “plowing.” Continue reading “reading Tozer’s The Pursuit of God”